Maths – (30.06.20)

LI: To represent and calculate ratio

Following on from yesterday’s lesson, today we’ll continue to look at ratio. We will start by looking at a simple fraction question and thinking about how this relates to ratio. First you will learn how to identify, say and write ratios. Then you will learn how to simplify ratios. Let’s look at the first question together!

Screenshot 2020-06-30 at 07.29.15

There are 18 sandwiches altogether. 12 are cheese and 6 are cucumber, so we can simplify this ratio by dividing each number by six – 12 ÷ 6 = 2 and 6 ÷ 6 = 1 so the ratio of cheese to cucumber sandwiches is 2:1. The ratio of cucumber to cheese sandwiches is 1:2.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zqsjcmn

Maths – (30.06.20)

LI: To represent and calculate ratio

Following on from yesterday’s lesson, today we’ll continue to look at ratio. We will start by looking at a simple fraction question and thinking about how this relates to ratio. First you will learn how to identify, say and write ratios. Then you will learn how to simplify ratios. Let’s look at the first question together!

Screenshot 2020-06-30 at 07.29.15

There are 18 sandwiches altogether. 12 are cheese and 6 are cucumber, so we can simplify this ratio by dividing each number by six – 12 ÷ 6 = 2 and 6 ÷ 6 = 1 so the ratio of cheese to cucumber sandwiches is 2:1. The ratio of cucumber to cheese sandwiches is 1:2.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zqsjcmn

Maths – (29.06.20)

LI: To apply my knowledge of ratio

A ratio shows you how much of one thing there is compared to another. The two amounts are written with a colon (:) between them, like this a:b. When saying the ratio out loud, you would usually say, “a to b”. The order you write a ratio is really important. You must write the quantity of the object that is mentioned first, followed by the quantity of the second object. If you don’t, the proportions change!

Example 1:

For every apple, there are two oranges.

apple and oranges

This statement has compared the amounts of two fruits. Since apples were mentioned first, you write that amount first, followed by the number of oranges: apples : orangesso the correct ratio is 1:2 If the amount of apples and oranges changed, the ratio would change.

3 Apples and 4 oranges

Now for every three apples, there are four oranges. The ratio would be written as 3:4.

Example 2:

ice creams

For every five strawberry ice creams, there are six vanilla ice creams. Lucy has written the ratio as 6:5. Is she correct?

Oops, Lucy has made a mistake. Instead of writing the ratio as strawberry to vanilla (the order in which the statement says), she has written it as vanilla to strawberry. The correct ratio would be 5:6.

Example 3:

Sometimes, you might see that a ratio statement can be written in a number of ways – this is a form of simplifying the ratio.

8 dots and 6 dots

For every eight yellow dots, there are six orange dots. This would make the ratio 8:6. However, you could also say: For every four yellow dots, there are three orange dots. The ratio would now be 4:3. You have halved the original amounts on both sides to create a simplified ratio. Now that you cannot divide either side of the ratio anymore, it is in its simplest form.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z6tcf82

Maths – (25.06.20)

LI: To apply my knowledge of volume

In today’s lesson, you will learn to calculate the volume of cubes and cuboids. To do so, we’ll need to use the correct unit of measurement for finding the volume of fixed of a fixed object, called cubic units. So today, we’ll be using cubic centimetres (cm³) and cubic metres (m³) to measure the the volume of the cubes and cuboids.

Volume is the amount of 3D space that is taken up by something. The formula used when calculating volume is length x width x height.

Screenshot 2020-06-25 at 07.40.04

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zb2n2v4